The Rocky Mountains and The Shining

– The Rocky Mountains –

–  The Stanley Hotel – 

– The Shining –

The Stanley Hotel, at the entrance to Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado
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The Historic Stanley Hotel’s History

 

The Stanley earned a reputation as a paranormal nerve center long before King’s arrival at the hotel, completed in 1909 as an elite, 420-room retreat by entrepreneur and inventor F.O. Stanley, co-founder of the Stanley Motor Carriage Co.

During the years since his death in 1940, the apparition of Mr. Stanley reportedly has appeared to guests checking in at the reception desk, and claims hold that the phantom of the late Flora Stanley, a pianist, sometimes can be heard tickling the ivories in the empty music room.

In case you are having trouble locating the apparitions, one ghostly white-ish figure is on the stairs, looking into the landing area, on the right-hand corner. The other “ghost” is a blurry figure, seemingly going up (or down) the stairs on the left.



Thousands of tired, nerve shaken, over civilized people are beginning to find out that getting out into the wilderness is 
exactly what they needed. While many outdoorsy folk choose camping in tents or stays in rustic cabins, the parks historically have offered its pilgrims more opulent alternatives, both within established boundaries and in their verges. Whether it’s Death Valley’s newly restored four diamond–rated
Inn at Death Valley
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Once the honeymoon haven of Clark Gable and Carole Lombard), La Quinta Resort and Spa (where Frank Capra wrote It’s a Wonderful Life), or the Great Smoky Mountains’ farm-to-fork, design-centric Blackberry Farm, to quote Muir, “Nature’s peace will flow into you.
If you are visiting bring a camper.
I would never buy one myself . 

 

”In the fall of 1974, writer Stephen King and his wife stopped for the night at an old hotel overlooking the city. Once among the grande dames of the west, The Stanley Hotel had fallen on hard times and was a ghost of its former, Edwardian-era self.
.Upon arriving, the Kings learned the hotel was closing for the winter and only a skeleton crew remained. Nonetheless, the couple was checked into Room 217, the Presidential Suite, as the only paying guests.
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By the time he stubbed it out, he’d worked out the “bones” of what would become his third novel, and first best-seller, “The Shining.”

That night, the author had a nightmare in which he saw his young son being chased down the hotel’s long, empty corridors by a predatory, possessed fire hose.

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He woke drenched in sweat and stepped to the balcony to smoke a cigarette. By the time he stubbed it out, he’d worked out the “bones” of what would become his third novel, and first best-seller, “The Shining.”

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King’s nightmare turned out to be a sweet dream and breath of life for the historic landmark that served as inspiration for the fictional Overlook Hotel.

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The surge in spectrally motivated tourism after the book was published in 1977 still is going strong, thanks in part to a 1980 film adaptation directed by Stanley Kubrick and starring Jack Nicholson.

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That movie, widely considered one of the scariest ever made, plays nonstop on a designated channel at the upscale hotel 90 minutes northwest of Denver.

Choose between Stephen King’s cinematic fright fest or the one playing out a few channels away “It” another scary treat.  Make sure you catch at 8 p.m. a great show by illusionist Aiden Sinclair.

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Followed by a ghost tour through the hotel’s darkened corridors, basements and off-limits areas.

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The Stanley earned a reputation as a paranormal nerve center long before King’s arrival at the hotel, completed in 1909 as an elite, 420-room retreat by entrepreneur and inventor F.O. Stanley, co-founder of the Stanley Motor Carriage Co.

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During the years since his death in 1940, the apparition of Mr. Stanley reportedly has appeared to guests checking in at the reception desk, and claims hold that the phantom of the late Flora Stanley, a pianist, sometimes can be heard tickling the ivories in the empty music room.

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The Stanley Hotel is famous for its old world charm. Multiple renovations have restored this 140-room hotel to its original grandeur while offering over 14,000 square feet of sophisticated meeting and event space.
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Equipped with modern amenities. Only an hour away from Denver, it is the ideal destination for your Colorado getaway.

BOOK THE STANLEY HOTEL HERE

 

THE ROCKY MOUNTAINS

BEGINNERS GUIDE

 

If you have never been to Rocky Mountain National Park, we have some good news: the 100-year-old national park hasn’t changed much. With its rolling tundra, stoic mountain peaks, glacier-carved valleys and abundant wildlife, the same things that made this place special in 1915 when it was declared a national park continue to make it special today. But with the park’s staggering 416 square miles, it can seem a little daunting to know where to start.

We have some more good news: we’ve compiled all the visitor info you need to make your first visit a breeze with this beginner’s guide to Rocky Mountain National Park.

THE LAY OF THE LAND

Rocky Mountain National Park has two distinct halves, which are connected by the highest continuously paved road in North America: Trail Ridge Road. No trip to the park is complete without driving the 48-mile road in its entirety. However, it is important to note that the road is closed in winter due to snowpack.

The eastern slope of the park includes such notable attractions as Longs Peak, Moraine Park, Bear Lake, Wild Basin and Sprague Lake, and as a result, it is the more heavily trafficked side of the park.

 

VACATION RENTALS ROCKY MOUNTAIN NATIONAL PARK

 

 

The western slope of the park features Colorado’s largest natural lake (Grand Lake), an expansive valley riddled with moose and elk (Kawuneeche Valley), the headwaters of the Colorado River, and more than a dozen backcountry valleys perfect for horseback and hiking excursions.

WHEN TO VISIT

Rocky Mountain National Park offers plenty of contrast from one season to the next. Summer (generally Memorial Day to Labor Day) is peak visitor season for good reason — trails are snow-free, the park’s wildlife is active, and the wildflowers are in full bloom. Reservations are advised for all accommodations during this season.

Things To Do In The Rocky Mountains

 

RAFTING COLORADO

Rafting the Colorado River, Poudre River, Clear Creek and others is popular in summer.  Choose to ride the whitewater rapids, or float down a more quiet river. 

The headwaters of the mighty Colorado start in Rocky Mountain National Park and feed the American Southwest.

The Cache La Poudre is Colorado’s only designated wild and scenic river.  It’s north of Rocky Mountain National Park running through Roosevelt National Forest and Colorado State Park from Cameron Pass toward Fort Collins.

The Rocky Mountains stretch some 3,000 miles from British Columbia and Alberta in Canada through Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, Colorado, and down to New Mexico in the U.S.
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The range offers dramatic wilderness, diverse wildlife and alpine lakes. Colorado’s Rocky Mountain National Park is traversed by numerous hiking trails and the famously scenic Trail Ridge Road, a 48-mile highway that reaches a high point of 12,183ft.
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No matter the length of your trip to our side of Rocky Mountain National Park, we have some adventurous favorites to keep you busy. And once you’re here, you’ll see that the altitude isn’t what takes your breath away.
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Because of their large presence in North America, water from the Rockies supplies about ¼ of the United States. Economic resources of the Rocky Mountains are varied and abundant. Minerals found in the Rocky Mountains include significant deposits of copper, gold, lead, molybdenum, silver, tungsten, and zinc.

CHEAP HOTELS AROUND THE ROCKY MOUNTAINS

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The words “Mountain States” generally refer to the US States which encompass the US Rocky Mountains.

These are oriented north-south through portions of the states of Montana, Idaho, Wyoming, Colorado, Utah, and New Mexico.

Even the smallest of mountains in Rocky Mountain National Park makes for a lofty perch: The park’s topography ranges from “low” valleys at 8,000 feet in elevation to the park’s highest mountain, Longs Peak, which is 14,259 feet high

 

Aspenglen Campground

Firewood For Sale – Seasonal

Ice Available For Sale – Seasonal

Food Storage Lockers – Seasonal

Trash/Recycling Collection – Seasonal

Amphitheater – Seasonal

Staff or Volunteer Host On Site – Seasonal

Potable Water – Seasonal

Flush Toilets – seasonal

Showers – None

Near the Fall River Entrance. Douglas fir, lodgepole pine, ponderosa pine and the occasional Engelmann spruce forests the campground, offering equal amounts of sun and shade. Grasses, shrubs and seasonal wildflowers fill the open meadows. Aspenglen contains several drive-to family sites for tents and RVs. A few sites are more secluded, walk-to tent sites.
TOTAL SITES: 52
Electric Hookups: 0
RV Only: 0
Tent Only: 13
Walk to/Boat to: 5
Group: 0
Horse: 0
Other: 0
OPEN TODAY

Glacier Basin Campground

Dump Station – Seasonal

Firewood For Sale – Seasonal

Ice Available For Sale – Seasonal

Food Storage Lockers – Seasonal

Trash/Recycling Collection – Seasonal

Amphitheater – Seasonal

Staff or Volunteer Host On Site – Seasonal

Potable Water – Seasonal

Flush Toilets – seasonal

Showers – None

A pleasant mix of Douglas fir, Lodgepole pine, Ponderosa pine, and the occasional Engelmann spruce forests the campground, offering equal amounts of sun and shade. Grasses, shrubs and seasonal wildflowers fill the open meadows.
TOTAL SITES: 150
Electric Hookups: 0
RV Only: 0
Tent Only: 73
Walk to/Boat to: 0
Group: 13
Horse: 0
Other: 0
CLOSED TODAY

Longs Peak Campground

Food Storage Lockers – Seasonal

Trash/Recycling Collection – Seasonal

Staff or Volunteer Host On Site – Seasonal

Potable Water – Seasonal

Vault Toilets – year round

Showers – None

Longs Peak Campground is located about 20 minutes south of Estes Park on Hwy 7. This small, tents-only campground is forested and at a fairly high elevation of 9500 feet (3000 m).
TOTAL SITES: 26
Electric Hookups: 0
RV Only: 0
Tent Only: 26
Walk to/Boat to: 0
Group: 0
Horse: 0
Other: 0
OPEN TODAY

Moraine Park Campground

Dump Station – Seasonal

Firewood For Sale – Seasonal

Ice Available For Sale – Seasonal

Food Storage Lockers

Trash/Recycling Collection

Amphitheater – Seasonal

Staff or Volunteer Host On Site – Seasonal

Potable Water

Flush Toilets – seasonal

Vault Toilets – year round

Showers – None

Moraine Park Campground (8,160 feet) is located in Colorado’s awe-inspiring Rocky Mountain National Park, near the Beaver Meadows Entrance on Highway 36. It is situated on the north side of Moraine Park, offering beautiful views of the vast park and the surrounding mountains.
TOTAL SITES: 244
Electric Hookups: 0
RV Only: 0
Tent Only: 101
Walk to/Boat to: 49
Group: 0
Horse: 0
Other: 0
CLOSED TODAY

Timber Creek Campground

Dump Station – Seasonal

Firewood For Sale – Seasonal

Trash/Recycling Collection – Seasonal

Amphitheater – Seasonal

Staff or Volunteer Host On Site – Seasonal

Potable Water – Seasonal

Flush Toilets – seasonal

Showers – None

Timber Creek Campground is the only campground on the west side of the park. Located at 8900 feet (3000 m) along the Colorado River about eight miles north of the Grand Lake entrance to Rocky Mountain National Park. A mountain pine beetle infestation caused most of the trees to be removed, so there is no shade at campsites.
TOTAL SITES: 98
Electric Hookups: 0
RV Only: 0
Tent Only: 30
Walk to/Boat to: 0
Group: 0
Horse: 0
Other: 0

Frequently Asked Questions

How do I reserve a campsite?

For summer reservations at Aspenglen, Glacier Basin, and Moraine Park, visit Recreation.gov or call (877) 444-6777. You can reserve up to six months in advance. Longs Peak and Timber Creek are first-come, first-served only, and Moraine Park is first-come, first-served in winter, so reservations aren’t available.

How hard is it to get a campsite?
In July and August, campgrounds usually fill every day by early afternoon, and most sites at reservable campgrounds are reserved well in advance. In June and September, campgrounds tend to fill on weekends.

How many nights can I camp?
From May 1 through October 15, you can stay seven nights total parkwide. For example, if you stayed three nights at a campground on one trip and four nights at another campground on another, you wouldn’t be able to stay any more nights that summer season. You can also stay an additional 14 nights between November 1 and April 30.

Do you have limits on RV or trailer length?
Yes.
Aspenglen: 30 feet
Glacier Basin: 35 feet
Longs Peak: Tents only
Moraine Park: 40 feet
Timber Creek: 30 feet

Can I have a campfire?
Yes, but only in metal fire grates. Never leave fires or coals unattended. Fires must be completely extinguished before leaving the campsite or going to bed. Gathering firewood and fire-starting materials is prohibited.

Can I buy firewood at the campground?
In summer, yes: firewood is sold at all campgrounds. We ask that you purchase firewood near or in the park. Firewood from out-of-state may hold harmful insects that could spread to the park.

How many people and vehicles can I have at my site?
You can have up to eight people. You can have either two tents or one vehicle and one camping unit (tent, RV, or trailer/tow). Extra vehicles must park in overflow areas. At group sites, special rules apply. Please see Glacier Basin Campground on this page.

When are checkin and checkout?
At all campgrounds, checkout is at 12 pm, and checkin is at 1 pm.

Do you have quiet hours?
Yes, from 10 pm to 6 am.

Does my campsite fee include entrance to the park?
No, a separate entrance fee applies.

Does my pass give me a discount?
America the Beautiful Senior and Access Pass holders get a 50% discount on camping fees.

Can I buy ice at the campground?
At Aspenglen, Glacier Basin, and Moraine Park: yes. At Longs Peak and Timber Creek: no.

Can I bring my pet?
Yes, with some rules. Pets must be on leashes no longer than six feet. Please clean up after them. Pets are prohibited on all trails, tundra, and meadow areas. Pets may not make noise that impacts visitors or wildlife.

Can I use fireworks in the campground?
No, the use of fireworks is prohibited in the park.

Can I ride my skateboard, rollerblades, scooter, or similar devices in the campground?
No, those are all prohibited.

 

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